The 14 Rights Of The Child Writer.

Daniel Pennac, in his book The Rights Of The Reader, created 10 rights for child readers and these can be viewed as a poster here.

In 2011, The National Writing project produced its own ten rights for writers which includes the following:

  1. The right not to share.
  2. The right to change things and cross things out.
  3. The right to write anywhere.
  4. The right to a trusted audience.
  5. The right to get lost in your writing and not know where you’re going.
  6. The right to throw things away.
  7. The right to take time to think.
  8. The right to borrow from other writers.
  9. The right to experiment and break rules.
  10. The right to work electronically, draw or use a pen and paper.

Jeni Smith helped write these rights and you can listen to her talk in the video below:

In my classroom, I have changed a few of these and added a couple of my own. At present these are unofficial rights which have appeared organically as the year has gone on. When my class come back from our holidays though, I’m going to show them the 10 rights of a reader and see what rights they would want as writers. I will then look to see if I need to change my draft – which you can find below:

  1. The right to have a writer-teacher.
  2. The right not to share.
  3. The right to change things and cut things out.
  4. The right to use your favoured writing process
  5. The right to a home/school writing journal.
  6. The right to a supportive audience.
  7. The right to a pupil-conference where you receive genuine writing advice.
  8. The right to get lost in our writing and not know where you’re going.
  9. The right to abandon free-writing pieces.
  10. The right to take time to think and write.
  11. The right to borrow from other writers.
  12. The right to experiment and take risks.
  13. The right to work electronically and illustrate my work.
  14. The right to publish my favourite writing into the class book-stock and beyond.

In preparation, my question is – what would the rights be in your class? What have I missed? Do any of these seem unrealistic? Could you do the same activity with your class? Can we share what our classes come up with and try and create a @WritingRocks_17 list of writer’s rights together?

You can leave your rights as a comment below!

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