The Diamond Moment: One Of The Most Precious Writing Lessons You Can Teach

The Diamond Moment: One Of The Most Precious Writing Lessons You Can Teach

This is how I write. I take a moment – an image, a memory, a phrase, an idea – and I hold it in my hands and declare it a treasure – Lucy Calkins.

This was one of the most profound and long-lasting writing lessons I taught last year. It was something both myself and the children in my class would return to and talk about time and time again. By the end of the year, children understood and could articulate themselves when I asked: What is the ‘diamond moment’ here?

At the beginning of the year, I noticed that many of the children, whilst great at coming up with universal topics for writing – were unable to zoom in on the quality of the topic. It was too ‘universal’. Too large. Too general. When I finally gave this lesson – a lesson on finding the moment – the briefest of moments in a topic that are most significant to write about – the children’s writing transformed. It became part of our class meta-language and I hope something the children will keep as a lesson for a lifetime.

We must look for the significance within the experience – the personal response to it – not a bland recalling of events past. – Loane (p.5)

It was in our class writing project on memoir that the lesson was first taught. It was an attempt to focus the children on the personal and poetic significance of the experience they wished to to retell. In many ways, children took what would otherwise be the most ordinary of events and made them sound and read as extraordinary. It worked beautifully. It was about adding more than a ‘recount of a past event’. Where was the significance – where was the poetry? Where were the details? Where was the storytelling?

What was realised by myself and the children was that actually – you don’t need to have been to Disneyland or a Caribbean island to have something memorable to write about.

We can all see the difference between students simply telling something that happened to them and actually revealing something of themselves in expressing what it means for them. – Loane (p.45)

To this day, this writing project was the best I’ve ever conducted. What surprised me though was how the concept of searching for that diamond moment could be translated to all other genres.

It is not uncommon for any of us to feel that we have nothing in our lives worth writing about, but through immersion in stories, real and imagined, we see and hear the multitude of universal experiences being recorded. – Loane (p.5)

The idea of a ‘diamond moment’ began to be used in the children’s story writing and non-fiction projects. Children were able to turn massive epic sagas into short, snappy and wholly entertaining flash-fictions. Their non-fiction texts all of a sudden had a new sharper focus – explaining and sharing personally significant things – things that they truly cared about – to their readers.

If you liked this blog post, you may also like to read about our approach to writing we call Real-World Literacy.

If you would like to receive updates from our blog, you can click the follow button in the top right-hand-corner of the page. Alternatively, you can follow us on twitter at @lit4pleasure

References:

  • Atwell, N. (2014). In the Middle: Writing, reading, and learning with adolescents, (3rd Ed) Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
  • Calkins, L. (1998) The art of teaching writing. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
  • Loane, G., (2016) Developing Young Writers: I’ve got something to say London: Routledge
  • Rosen, M., (1998) Did I hear you write? London: Five Leaves Publication
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FREE Pamphlet: Explorative Considerations For Teaching Greater Depth Writers

A colleague at work set me the challenge of considering whether it was possible to teach writing to greater depth. I went back to the research which informed our Writing For Pleasure pedagogy and found a couple of articles which looked specifically at gifted and talent writers to see what they had to say. I also used a few pieces of literature on good writing teaching to help me. The pamphlet below provides information and practical advice on what I found out. For references, please see the end of this pamphlet.

DOWNLOAD the pamphlet for FREE here:

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If you liked this blog post, you may also like to read: How to give greater depth writers the teaching they deserve.

If you would like to receive updates from our blog, you can click the follow button in the top right-hand-corner of the page. Alternatively, you can follow us on twitter at @lit4pleasure

 

How to give your greater depth writers the teaching they deserve

How to give your greater depth writers the teaching they deserve

When I was ten and a new pupil at secondary school, I wrote my first set homework assignment for R.E. – a recount of the one of the seven plagues of Egypt. After a few days my book came back with the comment (in a mean little script written in red pen): Is this all your own work? Mortified, because it was my own work and I’d written it like a story, with my usual enthusiasm and emotional investment, I approached the teacher on the pretext that I hadn’t been able to read her comment. “Well,” came the reply,” it was so vivid.” I said I had written it myself, but I could see she didn’t believe me. To this day I still feel the injury to my early strong sense of myself as a writer, and the need I had to own and assert my talent, though of course in those days, when the teacher was the ultimate authority figure, it didn’t make any difference to her judgment.

Having read the small body of research (Garrett & Moltzen 2011 & Gagne 2000 & 2003) on the topic of gifted and talented young writers, I think I would in the past have qualified as such. I was a self-styled Jo March, with a drive to write from a very early age. I wrote out of desire, with engagement, pleasure, absorption, satisfaction, as escapism too. I wrote a great deal at home – stories, unfinished novels, programmes for shows put on with friends in somebody’s backyard, started a magazine with me as editor –  one issue a month, in which I remember trying to serialize ‘Coral Island’ for some reason. Also, aged six, a letter to the BBC (wireless!) asking for another series of ‘The Windjammers’ – swashbuckling adventures on the high seas, listened to avidly on Children’s Hour. My memory is that, in those days, we were never asked to do any of these different kinds of writing in primary school. Certainly, once I reached secondary, we were not required in English lessons to be imaginatively ‘creative’ or purposeful, but largely to write critical essays on the (classic) book we had spent a whole half-term reading aloud round the class. I hope it’s different now, but I do hear stories which make me think it may not necessarily be.

I have recently known several pupils who were clearly outstanding as writers.They were all highly motivated, persistent, committed and self-regulating, and all wrote extensively and with pleasure at home. So far, so good. But there is one interesting small piece of research which got me thinking about whether we are doing all we might in school for ’high ability’ young writers like these. It’s a definition of what ‘gifted’ and ‘talented’ (two separate terms) could mean. According to Gagne (2000, 2003) giftedness is an individual’s potential or predisposition for outstanding achievement. His research also suggests that giftedness isn’t fixed but can be developed, which surely has ramifications for how we see and teach all apprentice writers. ‘Talents’ are defined simply as the manifestation of this potential. The conditions which are influential in the realisation of giftedness as talents are: intrapersonal – coming from inside, being intrinsically motivated, and environmental – particularly the support of parents and the home ethos, and that of teachers and the school. (Chance is also a possible factor). This research draws attention to the potential influence of the classroom on the writing lives of such children, and implies that some classroom strategies could actually have an adverse effect on their progress. So the question is, what kind of writing teaching would be the most valuable for gifted and talented writers?  Do we in fact need to do anything to support them or, with the demands of getting other less able children to ‘met standard’, is it justifiable to praise and showcase their writing but then leave them to their own devices, trusting that they will always write something good? Our view is that it’s not. They need good teaching and writing that challenges them as much as everyone else does.

If you’re a regular reader of our blogs you’ll know that we are passionately committed to promoting and teaching a rigorous, research-informed, inclusive Writing for Pleasure pedagogy. You can read about it here. The basic idea is to make the classroom a place where children want to write. Consistent research results from the National Literacy Trust indicate that for many, including high ability writers, it clearly isn’t. Taking as read that the Writing for Pleasure pedagogy supports all young writers, this post is specifically about some of the ways in which it enables gifted writers to realise their talents fully in the writing classroom.

Being part of a classroom community of writers

In a community of writers, writing by teachers and pupils alike is shared, talked about, responded to, reflected on and presented, in a safe and positive atmosphere where all are seen as writers, and believe themselves to be. A talented writer, like anyone else, needs to feel part of and act in important social structures such as these, where children learn things of value from each other and help each other to learn.The alternative is to have all children writing in isolation, and so mutual benefits and huge opportunities for learning and making relationships are lost.

Learning the writing processes

Being explicitly taught the writing processes means that, paradoxical as it might seem, confident talented writers become free to think about and use a personal version of the processes which suits them better. They may even try out several different versions when writing in different genres, and gain more knowledge of themselves as writers. Many professional writers have reflected interestingly on their processes, and these could be shared and discussed.

Creating purposeful and authentic class writing projects

Children will be much more engaged and motivated if the class writing project is felt by them to be relevant to their lives and funds of knowledge, to have personal meaning for them. Putting their own idea into the genre being studied in the class writing project immediately creates an authentic purpose and a personal connection to the writing. In one piece of research, gifted writers specifically reported enhanced volition, enjoyment and satisfaction when given the opportunity to write about things of significance to themselves. As one young writer put it so well, the best and most supportive teachers are those who help you write ‘with ease.’

Having time, space and freedom for personal writing projects in school: writing every day

Writing daily and having agency to write on topics of their own choice, in their own way, for their own purposes, and at their own pace is the key to motivation, efficacy and pleasure. For gifted pupils, the opportunity to write in this way at school may be something like the experience of writing at home, where often much of their most creative, varied and successful writing takes place (though of course there will be differences). Having time and space on a daily basis satisfies the cognitive need of gifted writers to simply write, and allows them to practise and improve their craft (and writing is a craft!). Time, space, freedom and the interest of the teacher all contribute to a writer’s sense of self as someone engaged in important work, but this won’t be maintained if children are constantly forced into writing according to someone else’s design. Putting it bluntly, a diet of teacher-led, teacher-chosen topics may affect motivation adversely, and will certainly result in the writer losing the feeling that writing is a real-world activity ,has a personal point and is purposeful.

Being taught by a writer- teacher

A writer-teacher (a writer who happens to teach and a teacher who happens to write) is well placed to do a number of things to nurture gifted writers. A teacher’s passion for engaging in personal writing works to maintain pleasure, motivation and tenacity in the students, and makes it possible to share difficulties, give advice, suggest strategies and provide immediate feedback. Writing study lessons, which should take place regularly, can be differentiated for gifted writers. Why not get them to consider conveying several points of view in a piece of fiction, or experimenting with narrative structures and different kinds of narrator? Or revising drastically, judging what to take out rather than put in? (Hemingway describes this as an intense source of pleasure). Conferencing with gifted writers can be conducted at a high level, and these writing study lessons (which maybe demand another blog post!) can be recalled during the conference as a way of helping them move their writing on.

Reading for pleasure as well as writing for pleasure

These two are strongly interconnected. Gifted writers are likely to be committed readers, but it is still important for them to be provided with a high-quality and eclectic classroom library based on a teacher’s knowledge of children’s literature and on peer recommendations, and which contains plenty of challenging texts. They too, need to feel part of a community of readers with ample time to talk with others about their reading. Research suggests that children who read more write more and better, using their reading, often unconsciously, as mentor texts.Teachers need to take forward children’s experience of fiction and take advantage of the many opportunities for linking the way a particular book is written and the reader’s own writing. Plant an idea. Say ‘Why not try that out for yourself?’

Will those gifted writers write with the same pleasure and satisfaction as they progress up the education system? I don’t know. Maybe they will, if there can be a balance between the demands of the curriculum and assessment practices and the freedom and space to write with ease and affectively about personal experiences, thoughts and feelings. Agency and writing affectively was totally absent from the writing curriculum of my secondary school, and to a large extent from my primary school. But all that was a long time ago…… wasn’t it…?

Please support us by clicking on the ‘Follow’ button in the top-right corner (or if you’re on a tablet or smartphone at the bottom of the screen).

You can also follow us and contribute to the Writing For Pleasure teacher community @WritingRocks_17

References

  • Gagné, F. (2000). Understanding the complex choreography of talent development through DMGT-based analysis. In K. A. Heller, F. S. Monks & R. F. Subotnik (Eds.), The international handbook of giftedness and talent (2nd ed.) (pp. 67- 79). Oxford, England: Elsevier.
  • Gagné, F. (2003). Transforming gifts into talents: The DMGT as a developmental theory. In N. Colangelo & G. A. Davis (Eds.), Handbook of gifted education (3rd ed.) (pp. 60-74). Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon
  • Garrett, L.& Moltzen, R.(2011) Writing because I want to, not because I have to: Young gifted writers’ perspectives on the factors that”matter” in developing expertise. English teaching:Practice and Critique, May, 2011, Volume 10, Number 1 pp.165-180

 

National Literacy Trust’s Annual Survey Reveals That A Writing For Pleasure Pedagogy Is Needed Now More Than Ever.

The headline from this year’s National Literacy Trust’s survey into young people’s attitudes towards writing is unsurprising but increasingly concerning.

For a number of years now we have used the trust’s annual survey, which focuses on responses from over 40,000 apprentice writers, to make the case for a Writing For Pleasure pedagogy.

Throughout these years, we have seen that young people have either an indifference or a dislike for writing but this year it has climbed to over 50%. We also have 40% of children who only ever write when they have to. This is quite staggering.

Obviously, the only way you can stop apprentice writers from learning to write and liking it (in this densely verbal and social culture in which we live) is to teach it the way we currently teach it. Imagine for a moment that these statistics were related to talk and that 50% of young people were indifferent about talking and sharing their thoughts and expertise with their teacher and/or peers. This would be cause for a national crisis surely? You would also have to question how children are being put off so dramatically to do what comes quite naturally.

Daily writing levels have been falling since the survey first began and this year they have reached their lowest ever with less than 20% of apprentice writers writing anything that wasn’t directly for school purposes.

  • Again, despite our densely verbal and social culture, over half of apprentice writers are lead to believe that they find it hard to decide what to write.
  • 1/5 young people believe writing to be a difficult task.
  • Only around 40% of apprentice writers believe writing to be a fun activity.
  • Attitudes towards writing have been in decline ever since the release of the new National Curriculum in 2014.

Are pedagogies which are simply ‘schooling’ children and not based on effective practice having an adverse effect on children’s attitudes and educational outcomes?

In response, and working with the National Literacy Trust, we have produced a number of resources to help you build a Writing For Pleasure pedagogy. These can be downloaded from their website here: National Literacy Trust: Writing For Pleasure Resources

Writing For Pleasure is based on 14 research-informed principles which not only cover the very best effective practices but also happen to be the most affective ones too!

You can read our Writing For Pleasure manifesto here: Writing For Pleasure Manifesto

You can also download and read their full report here: Full Report

We invite comments below. Let’s start a conversation.

Please support us by clicking on the ‘Follow’ button in the top-right corner (or if you’re on a tablet or smartphone at the bottom of the screen).

You can also join and contribute to the Writing For Pleasure community by following us at @WritingRocks_17

Join Us For Our FIRST Ever Writing For Pleasure Conference

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Dear Writing For Pleasure friends.

It is with great pleasure to announce our first ever Writing For Pleasure conference. It will take place on Friday the 13th of July at Canterbury Christ Church University. We have a truly unbelievable line-up to. We hope you’re as excited as we are!

We suggest you book your ticket now by visiting –> 

By emailing for a ticket directly here: primaryenglishresearchhub@gmail.com

Alternatively, you can make a phone booking here: 01303257280

Here’s the current line-up with even more wonderful people to be confirmed!

  • Tracy Parvin (UK Literacy Association President) will give an introductory talk.

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  • We will be giving a keynote speech about our Writing For Pleasure manifesto and going into detail about the 14 principles that make a Writing For Pleasure pedagogy affective and effective teaching practice.

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  • Piers Torday will be discussing what Writing For Pleasure means from the perspective of a children’s author.

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  • Our final keynote will be from Michael Rosen. He will be discussing his knowledge and expertise on what Writing For Pleasure can look like in the classroom. This is likely to be informed by his recent publication on the same subject.

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  • We also have workshops from Martin Galway. He will be talking about what we can learn from legendary writer-teacher Donald Graves.

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  • Jamie Evans will be discussing how you can use personal writing journals to promote writing for pleasure with children who may traditionally struggle with being writers in class.

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  • Nicola Izibili from The Writing Web will be doing a workshop on the power of verbal feedback and conducting pupil conferencing as a writer-teacher to improve children as writers.

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  • General Secretary and former president of the UK Literacy Association David Reedy will be doing a workshop on what writing is for and what writing involves. 

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  • We will also be joined by who will be doing a workshop on writing poetry with and amongst children.

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  • We will also be doing our popular workshop on how memoir writing can fabulously transform yourself and your community of apprentice writers.

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This conference has been made possible by our dear friends at the United Kingdom Literacy Association, Primary English Research Hub , Dr Rebecca Austin and Jamie Evans. A big thank you to everyone. Can’t wait to see you all in July!

 

 

Writing For Pleasure: Scaffolding New Learning And Setting Writing Goals

Scaffolding New Learning And Setting Writing Goals

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According to research, Writing For Pleasure teachers will scaffold new writing projects by setting both process and product oriented writing goals. This happens in a mastery based writing environment which has an atmosphere of inquiry, investigation and experimentation at its heart.

A little note about terminology here before we begin.

  • Distant Writing Goals – often the end goal of a writing project. The final writing ‘product’. The purpose and audience for the writing is revealed, considered and discussed at this point.
  • Product Writing Goals – often writers will talk about their finished writing being their ‘product’. The thing that is created. Product writing goals then are the intentions we have for the writing. What will we have to do to make this an effective product…? This is very different to success criteria which don’t always attend to the intentions for the writing nor are they always authentically generated with the whole writing community.
  • Process Writing Goals – these are goals we often set ourselves as writers. We will often give ourselves mini-deadlines. Rarely do we take on a large project in one go. Rather, we take it a step at a time. For example, ‘We need to try and finish this draft in the next couple of days’. This doesn’t mean you don’t or can’t do two processes at the same time sometimes. For example, some of us, as ‘paragraph pilers,’ will often write a paragraph, read it through, maybe revise it a bit, maybe even proof-read it a little before moving onto our next paragraph. This doesn’t mean we won’t also put time aside to revise and edit it explicitly at a later stage.

Therefore, Writing For Pleasure teachers will in all likelihood:

Set A Distant Writing Goal:

‘Our next writing project is to produce an instructional text about something we are really good at. I was thinking we could write them to share with one another in our class library’? Does anyone have any other ideas?

Setting Product Writing Goals:

Writing For Pleasure teachers will set writing goals for writing projects collaboratively with their apprentice writers. According to research (Ames & Archer 1988; Covington 2000; Rooke 2013), it is important for children’s pleasure in writing that they are afforded some participation and agency in the formation of learning goals for class writing projects. This not only builds the learner’s motivation and engagement in the act of writing, but also helps him or her clarify what has to be undertaken to be successful at it. Children who are motivated and find pleasure in writing may also gain higher levels of self-efficacy as a result (Bandura & Schunk, 1981; Butler & Winnie, 1995; Rooke 2013). Gadd (2014) claims that this might require the teacher to ask questions like:

‘We’ve had a look at a few really good instructional texts from last year’s class. So, what might we have to think about to be successful at writing an excellent instructional text? Let’s write some product goals down on this flip-chart paper together.’

Over The Course Of The Project, Set Process Orientated Writing Goals:

The most effective type of writing goal, this means splitting up the different processes of writing to reduce children’s cognitive load, building their sense of self-efficacy and setting them further writing goals to achieve within these different processes. Writing For Pleasure teachers teach writing processes with a view to children applying them to class and personal projects and for individual mastery of them. This was the subject of our last #WritingRocks talk and you can view more about teaching the writing processes here.

  • Over the next couple of writing sessions, you are to have a plan for your instructional text ready.
  • OK. Using your plans to aid you, you have the next few writing sessions to draft your instructions.
  • I’m giving you this writing session to work with your talk partner on revising your instructional text ready for publication. If you feel you might need another session because you have a lot of revisions to do, let me know.
  • If you feel ready, I’ve put aside this writing session (and tomorrow’s if we need it) for us to proof-read and edit our instructional texts so that they are ‘reader-ready’.
  • Today is the day! This writing session is for you to publish your instructional texts into the class library. 

Writing Goals, Over Time, Create Self-Regulating And Independent Writers

Distant goals (like completing a class writing project e.g. ‘let’s write flash-fiction pieces for the year four classes’) will be sub-divided into more manageable ‘chunks,’ which allows not only for long-term progress to be monitored clearly and regularly, but also for children to feel a sense of satisfaction more frequently by completing these sub-goals (Bandura & Schunk, 1981; Butler & Winnie, 1995; Hmelo-Silver et al 2007). The cognitive load involved in writing is shared out across the writing processes, making the writing project feel more accessible and manageable to children. The ultimate aim is that, over time, these goals become automated and that children negotiate these cognitively challenging writing projects largely independently and using their own preferred writing process (see our last #WritingRocks chat). It also means that they can pursue personal writing projects in much the same way as they do their class ones.

If you set a process goal like ‘over the next three writing sessions, you must complete your revisions,’ why not consider that once children have completed this goal allowing them to pursue their personal writing projects whilst the rest of the class finish? Why not make this the expectation after any class writing goal has been completed?

The Types Of Learning Goals Writing For Pleasure Teachers Will Set:

Gadd (2014) suggests quite an open ended interpretation of writing process goals. They can be:

  • Single goals for all learners. We are all going to finish our plans today.
  • Multiple writing goals for learners to select from. Publish something entertaining, using any genre you like.
  • They can be worked on by learners at varying times or simultaneously. Wherever you find yourself in the writing process, carry on.
  • They can be designed to generate one intended outcome or a range of possible outcomes. ‘You must all write a biography of Buzz Aldrin’ or ‘You must all write a biography of someone you know personally’. ‘You have to write an information text about the water cycle’ Or ‘pick a genre and use it to write about the water cycle’.
  • They can be designed to include cooperative or interactive writing projects.
  • They can also be devised by the teacher and children together or the children alone.

Therefore, once the writing processes are established with the children in the school/class and they are fluent or experienced writers, Writing For Pleasure teachers will allow their learners to work on their writing goals at their own level and at their own pace (Garrett & Moltzen 2011; Paratore & McCormack, 2009; Pollard et al., 1994; Reutzel, 2007; Rubie-Davies 2010; Schumm & Avalos, 2009; Wyse & Torgerson 2017).

They are likely to set learning goals such as: ‘your writing goal is to describe the characters in the stories you write’ as opposed to ‘add a noun phrase to describe your character more’. Or ‘you need take more care when proofreading, use your editing checklist to help you’ rather than ‘you have some capital letters missing in this piece – correct them’.

There are links between the setting of these types of learning goals and how Writing For Pleasure teachers deliver these goals through pupil conferencing and potentially as writer-teachers. This is something we will discuss in future #WritingRocks chats!

Obvious Links To Other Writing For Pleasure Manifesto Principles:

The scaffolding of new learning and the setting of writing goals promotes Writing For Pleasure in a number of ways:

  1. It promotes the idea of self-efficacy because it helps apprentice writers to accomplish many goals and gives them the feeling that they can manage the writing project.
  2. It promotes a feeling of agency. Once experienced enough with the different processes and what they involve, children can set and control their own process goals.
  3. It can increase children’s motivation. They can see where their writing is leading to and they will be better able to set themselves specific writing-process goals which they will know how to achieve.
  4. It massively supports children’s self-regulation. Over time, apprentice writers will certainly gain a feeling of independence from external intervention and scaffolding and will be able to monitor their own writing projects.
  5. It will increase their writer-identity. Developing writing processes alongside a feeling of belonging and having an affinity with writing, allows children to feel part of a community where they can talk, craft and undertake the behaviours of a writer in a feeling of safety and understanding.

As an approach, it also reflects other principles outlined in our Writing For Pleasure manifesto including:

  • Creating An Environment For Writing because the children will be writing authentically matching the typical talk and behaviours of writers outside of the classroom, the writing environment will have the feeling of an authentic community of writers working together to create great writing. Writer-teacher and apprentice writers will talk together about the intentions for their writing projects, what the purpose and audience for the writing will be, what sorts of things they will have to consider to produce an excellent writing product and they will discuss their writing processes in achieving that goal.
  • Every child a writer because children will be undertaking the same kind of behaviours as professional writers they will feel like genuine writers too.
  • Purposeful and authentic writing projects because these sorts of projects allow children to negotiate all the different writing processes over a longer period of time and also consider a variety of product goals for different types of writing.
  • Reading, sharing and talking about writing because children can begin talking about their own writerly behaviours and their ‘ways of writing’ and tackling certain writing goals.
  • Building self-regulation because it encourages teachers to provide resources and scaffolds which help children negotiate the writing processes and ultimately shows apprentice writers how they can take an idea through to publishing largely on their own and at their own pace – completing the many goals involved as they go.
  • Personal writing projects allow children time and space to develop their own processes and goals for writing, about things they are motivated to write about and largely at their own pace.
  • Balancing composition and transcription by showing children how they can set specific goals which deal with both composition (seeing product related writing goals) and process goals (editing for spelling, punctuation and publishing for handwriting), children are better able to focus on a specific aspect of writing and to achieve certain goals related to produce a finished piece of writing which is both compositionally and transcriptionally sound.
  • Being a writer teacher because a writer-teacher will have a better understanding of how the writing processes work and how they set themselves their own writing goals, they will be able to pass on that wisdom to their apprentice writers.
  • Pupil conferences As a writer-teacher, you’ll be better able to share feedback and advice about the writing processes as well as the typical products goals for certain types of writing from a position of expertise and understanding.

Further Reading:

If you found this article interesting, you should also read:

www.teachersaswriters.org/general/writing-and-rewriting

www.change.org/p/michael-gove-straws-suck-ban-single-use-straws-across-the-uk

http://thewroxham.org.uk/our-learning/independent-writing-what-is-it/

Please support us by clicking on the ‘Follow’ button in the top-right corner (or if you’re on a tablet or smartphone at the bottom of the screen).

You can also follow us and contribute to the Writing For Pleasure teacher community @WritingRocks_17

References

  • Ames, C., & Archer, J. (1988). Achievement goals in the classroom: Students’ learning strategies and motivation processes. Journal of Educational Psychology, 80(3), 260–267.
  • Bandura, A., & Schunk, D. H. (1981). Cultivating competence, self-efficacy and intrinsic interest through proximal self-motivation. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 41(3), 586–598
  • Butler, D. L., & Winne, P. H. (1995). Feedback and self-regulated learning: A theoretical synthesis. Review of Educational Research, 65(3), 245–274.
  • Covington, M. V. (2000). Goal theory, motivation, and school achievement: An integrative review. Annual Review of Psychology, 51, 171–200.
  • Garrett, L., Moltzen, R., (2011) Writing because I want to, not because I have to: Young gifted writers’ perspectives on the factors that “matter” in developing expertise In English Teaching: Practice and Critique 165-180
  • Graham, S., Harris, K., Mason, L., (2011) Self-Regulated Strategy Development for Students With Writing Difficulties. Theory Into Practice. Vol. 50 Issue 1, p20-27
  • Hmelo-Silver, C., Duncan, R., & Chinn, C. (2007). Scaffolding and achievement in problem-based and inquiry learning: A response to Kirschner, Sweller, and Clark (2006). Educational Psychologist, 42(2), 99–107.
  • Langer, J. A. (2001). Beating the odds: Teaching middle and high school students to read and write well. American Educational Research Journal, 38(4), 837–880.
  • Latham, G. P., & Locke, E. A. (1991). Self-regulation through goal setting. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 50(2), 212–247
  • Paratore, J. R., & McCormack, R. L. (2009). Grouping in the middle and secondary grades: Advancing content and literacy knowledge. In K. D. Wood & W. E. Blanton (Eds.), Literacy instruction for adolescents: Research-based practice (pp. 420–441). New York, NY: The Guilford Press.
  • Paris, S. G., & Winograd, P. (2003). The role of self-regulated learning in contextual teaching: Principles and practices for teacher preparation (CIERA Report). Retrieved from http://www.ciera.org/library/archive/2001-04/0104parwin.htm
  • Pollard, A., Broadfoot, P., Croll, P., Osborn, M. and Abbott, D. (1994) Changing English in Primary Schools? The Impact of the Education Reform Act at KS1. London: Cassell
  • Reutzel, D. R. (2007). Organizing effective literacy instruction: Differentiating instruction to meet the needs of all children. In L. B. Gambrell, L. M. Morrow, & M. Pressley (Eds.), Best practices in literacy instruction (pp. 313–434). New York, NY: The Guilford Press.
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Writing For Pleasure Has Had A Research Grant Awarded! Participants Wanted!

Hi #WritingRocks colleagues. We have some really exciting news for you all! Our dear friends at The Goldsmiths Company have recently awarded #WritingRocks a research grant.

The grant means that, as a community, we can begin to explore, document and share teachers’ Writing For Pleasure practices from across the country!

The grant provides us with an amazing opportunity to:

  • Visit you at your school.
  • Talk together about your writing teaching.
  • Team-teach alongside you.
  • Do some CPD with you and your school (to discuss how you could enhance your Writing For Pleasure pedagogy further).
  • Talk with your apprentice writers about their writing and their feelings about being writers.

Who are we looking for?

We are looking for any UK based KS1/KS2 teachers who feel that they teach writing in such a way that it reflects some (but not necessarily all!) of the fourteen principles of our Writing For Pleasure manifesto. These principles include:

  1. Creating A Community Of Writers
  2. Every Child A Writer
  3. Reading, Sharing And Talking About Writing
  4. Purposeful & Authentic Writing Projects
  5. Explicitly Teach The Writing Processes
  6. Scaffolding New Learning & Setting Writing Goals
  7. Being Reassuringly Consistent
  8. Personal Writing Projects: Writing Everyday
  9. Balancing Composition With Transcription
  10. Teaching Self-Regulation Strategies
  11. Being A Writer-Teacher
  12. Pupil Conference: Meeting Children Where They Are
  13. Literacy For Pleasure: Reading And Writing Connecting
  14. Successful Interconnection Of These Principles

If you’d like to see a copy of the Writing For Pleasure manifesto, you can download it here.

If you, or a colleague you know, might find this interesting then please do drop us an email at literacyforpleasure@gmail.com

The deadline for applications is 31st July 2018

Please will you all share this post as much as possible on your social networks, we’d really appreciate it!

Many thanks,

Ross Young

UKLA National Committee Member

https://ukla.org/

National Literacy Trust member and contributor

https://literacytrust.org.uk/resources/writing-pleasure/