Joining The Literacy Club: The #WritingRocks Summary

613SRCG6MPL._AC_US218_This month’s #WritingRocks chat focused on contemporary psycholinguist Frank Smith’s ‘Joining the Literacy Club’.  HUGE thanks to everyone who contributed to the whirlwind of practical suggestions on how to join the literacy club, in the spirit of Frank Smith, including the ‘lurkers’ who we know learn so much from being a part of this online #writingforpleasure club.

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How To Have Children Writing Independent ‘Assessable’ Pieces Every Day.

This website is now archived. We have moved to our shiny new website at: http://www.writing4pleasure.com Please come and join us there.

The political hot-potato in terms of writing at the moment is independent writing. We have decided the tackle this subject head on by producing a mini-series of blog posts about how we have managed to create a writing community within our classroom which allows children to write independently every day.

We will cover all sorts of strategies we use to allow children to write high-quality assessed pieces independently. Some of them we have already discussed and you can find them here:

Continue reading “How To Have Children Writing Independent ‘Assessable’ Pieces Every Day.”

Do approaches which teach reading and writing together improve children’s writing?

It is often recommended that reading and writing should be taught together. And whilst studies have shown that reading instruction alone can raise writing attainment (Graham et al, 2017), and instruction specific to the teaching of writing can consequently raise reading progress (Graham & Hebert, 2011), no real studies have been done on integrated programmes or schemes. 

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GUEST BLOG: There is little success where there is little laughter. Writing jokes by Bee Hendry

‘What do you call a boomerang that just won’t come back? A stick!’

I grinned around the room. I heard a low rumble of faint mirth from my bemused teaching assistants. Blank looks from everyone else in my Year 1/2 class.

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GUEST BLOG: Teachers developing their writing for pleasure By Matthew Lane

Teachers developing their writing for pleasure.

By Matthew Lane @MrMJLane

Feeling a need to practise the craft of writing. Feeling capable and empowered to engage with the processes of writing including talking about writing.”. The working definition of Writing for Pleasure given in the Writing for Pleasure manifesto: a definition that can be applied as readily to teachers as to the pupils in the charge.

In developing my own writing for pleasure, I have been fortunate to be a member of a Writing Teachers group based at the University of East Anglia (UEA) since 2013. The group meets monthly to write, discuss our writing; discuss writing pedagogy and share the writing of our pupils. Being a member of this group has developed my skills as a writer, my skills as a teacher of writing, and – most importantly – my love for writing and the pleasure I take in the process of writing.

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GUEST BLOG: I think…that all teachers should do this so they can learn new stuff like us by Kat Vallely

 

Kat Vallely is a practitioner in Primary Teacher Education at the University of Greenwich

A classroom project creating a community of writers where the teacher writes alongside the children to foster writing as a meaningful, purposeful and enjoyable activity.

If nurtured and encouraged in a supportive way, writing can propel children to a world where they are able to explore, problem solve, express themselves and make sense of their lives.  However, the act of writing itself often evokes confusion and frustration and requires time, space, and a particular relationship between the teacher and the young writer.  Sadly, this relationship is often compromised as we find ourselves caught in an education system where excessive, extrinsic motivation and pressure to perform has the potential to drown a child’s intrinsic desire to write (Cremin et al. 2017).

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Give A Class ‘One’ Book To Write Through And You’ve Taught Them For A Day. Teach Them How To Use ‘Any’ Book And You’ve Taught Them For A Lifetime.

The goal of literary work (of literature as work) is to make the reader no longer a consumer, but a producer of text (Barthes 1975, cited by Rosen 1985, p.385)

This article is written with the intention to inform and provide reflection. With the Book Trust’s ‘The Write Book research summary coming out in March – we were excited to see what it concluded.

We have entitled our article after the saying that: you give a man a fish and he’ll eat for a day – teach a man to fish and he will eat for a lifetime. That is what we have tried to achieve through our own approach to the idea of traditional ‘Book Planning’ or ‘Novel Study’.

Continue reading “Give A Class ‘One’ Book To Write Through And You’ve Taught Them For A Day. Teach Them How To Use ‘Any’ Book And You’ve Taught Them For A Lifetime.”