Blog

GUEST BLOG: When Teachers Are Writers … By Jonny Walker

Image result for jonny walker education‘Teaching writing is arguably an artistic event, involving creativity and artistry, but if few teachers see themselves as writers or write alongside their students then the teaching of writing may be constrained by a lack of awareness of the complexities of composition and the significance of writers’ identities.’ Teresa Cremin and Debra Myhill, 2012, ‘Writing Voice: Creating Communities of Writers’, p. 126

This piece is all about teachers as writers. Whilst there is now a solid and growing body of research that indicates the benefits of teachers developing and reflecting on themselves as writers, knowing about this and doing something about it are different things.

Continue reading “GUEST BLOG: When Teachers Are Writers … By Jonny Walker”

GUEST BLOG: A writer-teacher’s reflection on her process and writer-identity by Lucy Fidler

Image result for writer-teacher

In this blog post, Lucy Fidler (@misslkfidler13) discusses her writing process and how it is influenced by her writer-identity. She then reflects on her writing process as a writer-teacher and how it affects how she teaches her young apprentice writers. Enjoy!

Continue reading “GUEST BLOG: A writer-teacher’s reflection on her process and writer-identity by Lucy Fidler”

GUEST BLOG: The future is make believe by Laura Hamm

Image result for laura hammThe Future Is Make Believe

I don’t remember much of primary school. But I have never forgotten the feeling of pride and delight at having my stories turned into books at school.

I started Fabled to capture that feeling, to help kids create and share their tales. I created the web app, aimed at home use (though I love seeing it in schools!) for the joy of it, for the 8 year old still in me. But 18 months of running it has turned me into a zealot for your cause – Literacy For Pleasure matters now more than ever.

I had a podcast, a newsletter, social media – but none of it felt enough. I wanted to shout far louder about why kids’ storytelling matters. And that’s why I’ve just launched a Kickstarter to publish a beautiful book of kid-authored tales – we’re calling the book, and the movement, The Future Is Make Believe. And it needs your help – spread the word, and please send me your kids stories (laura@fabledkids.com) – there’s room in the anthology, the podcast, and anywhere I have space I’ll be celebrating kids writing!

Continue reading “GUEST BLOG: The future is make believe by Laura Hamm”

Writing For Pleasure & The New Ofsted Framework

Image result for Ofsted framework

With the new Ofsted framework coming out recently, we wanted to look at where Writing For Pleasure fits. If you’re new to the idea of a Writing For Pleasure pedagogy, you can read about it here. 

Below is our response to the different aspects of the framework including: intentions, implementation, impact, progression of skills, acquisition of knowledge, tackling social disadvantage, providing cultural capital, honouring the local community, children’s personal development, child engagement, supporting children with SEND, challenging advanced writers, teachers’ subject and pedagogical knowledge.

Continue reading “Writing For Pleasure & The New Ofsted Framework”

GUEST BLOG: Creative writing is an essential skill for our children, not a nice-to-have by Ben Payne

30e1dd72-eb28-4c17-9935-4b6122ea8a30

At our launch event for the Ministry of Stories (MoS), held at No 10 Downing Street in November 2010, I overheard the PM, David Cameron, quizzing some of the children that we had brought with us from a Hackney primary school:

 “So, first you go to school and do your lessons; and then you go to Ministry of Stories and have fun. Is that right?”

I couldn’t blame him for asking because, at this point, we’d only been open for four days. When I left MoS, the writing and mentoring centre for children in east London that I founded with Lucy Macnab and the writer, Nick Hornby, a few months ago, I realised the thousands of children we’ve worked with since 2010 taught me a few things about writing and creativity.

Continue reading “GUEST BLOG: Creative writing is an essential skill for our children, not a nice-to-have by Ben Payne”

REVIEW: Welcome to Writing Workshop: Engaging today’s students with a model that works. Stacey Shubitz & Lynne R Dorfman

Image result for Welcome to Writing Workshop: Engaging today’s students with a model that works.It’s refreshing to see Stacey Shubitz and Lynne R. Dorfman come right out and say it: writing workshop is a model that works. Research has pointed towards this fact for many decades now and yet writing workshop remains on the periphery in the UK.

With a view to creating the conditions where Writing For Pleasure can flourish, the authors make the excellent decision to discuss the importance of setting up a writerly environment and to give practical advice on how to create a community of writers at the start. It’s only once this is established that they delve into the specific routines that make up the workshop approach.

Continue reading “REVIEW: Welcome to Writing Workshop: Engaging today’s students with a model that works. Stacey Shubitz & Lynne R Dorfman”

Joining The Literacy Club: The #WritingRocks Summary

613SRCG6MPL._AC_US218_This month’s #WritingRocks chat focused on contemporary psycholinguist Frank Smith’s ‘Joining the Literacy Club’.  HUGE thanks to everyone who contributed to the whirlwind of practical suggestions on how to join the literacy club, in the spirit of Frank Smith, including the ‘lurkers’ who we know learn so much from being a part of this online #writingforpleasure club.

Continue reading “Joining The Literacy Club: The #WritingRocks Summary”

Do approaches which teach reading and writing together improve children’s writing?

It is often recommended that reading and writing should be taught together. And whilst studies have shown that reading instruction alone can raise writing attainment (Graham et al, 2017), and instruction specific to the teaching of writing can consequently raise reading progress (Graham & Hebert, 2011), no real studies have been done on integrated programmes or schemes. 

Continue reading “Do approaches which teach reading and writing together improve children’s writing?”

GUEST BLOG: There is little success where there is little laughter. Writing jokes by Bee Hendry

‘What do you call a boomerang that just won’t come back? A stick!’

I grinned around the room. I heard a low rumble of faint mirth from my bemused teaching assistants. Blank looks from everyone else in my Year 1/2 class.

Continue reading “GUEST BLOG: There is little success where there is little laughter. Writing jokes by Bee Hendry”