REVIEW: Welcome to Writing Workshop: Engaging today’s students with a model that works. Stacey Shubitz & Lynne R Dorfman

Image result for Welcome to Writing Workshop: Engaging today’s students with a model that works.It’s refreshing to see Stacey Shubitz and Lynne R. Dorfman come right out and say it: writing workshop is a model that works. Research has pointed towards this fact for many decades now and yet writing workshop remains on the periphery in the UK.

With a view to creating the conditions where Writing For Pleasure can flourish, the authors make the excellent decision to discuss the importance of setting up a writerly environment and to give practical advice on how to create a community of writers at the start. It’s only once this is established that they delve into the specific routines that make up the workshop approach.

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GUEST BLOG: I think…that all teachers should do this so they can learn new stuff like us by Kat Vallely

 

Kat Vallely is a practitioner in Primary Teacher Education at the University of Greenwich

A classroom project creating a community of writers where the teacher writes alongside the children to foster writing as a meaningful, purposeful and enjoyable activity.

If nurtured and encouraged in a supportive way, writing can propel children to a world where they are able to explore, problem solve, express themselves and make sense of their lives.  However, the act of writing itself often evokes confusion and frustration and requires time, space, and a particular relationship between the teacher and the young writer.  Sadly, this relationship is often compromised as we find ourselves caught in an education system where excessive, extrinsic motivation and pressure to perform has the potential to drown a child’s intrinsic desire to write (Cremin et al. 2017).

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Power English: Writing. Download Our Free Sample Pack

Hi all!

This is just a quick post to say that Power English: Writing is coming out soon!

samplepowerenglishwritingPower English: Writing is an exciting new approach to teaching writing. It’s been written by me and my colleague Ross Young.

If you’re curious to see what it’s all about, you can now download a free sample here.

We’ve spent the best part of five years developing this approach and we are really excited to see it finally come out!

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GUEST BLOG: Am I A Teacher-Writer? By Sadie Phillips

This is a guest blog by Sadie Phillips. You can read more by visiting her blog here.

If reading is the key to learning, then writing is the lock.

Or rather, writing is the medium through which we unlock potential and empower children (and adults). We still depend on writing as the largest indicator of success and progress in learning. Therefore, it should have just as much emphasis as reading in school. For example, if we are Reading for Pleasure daily, should we not also be Writing for Pleasure daily too? If we are explicitly teaching children how to read, are we explicitly modelling the writing process to them too?

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Writing For Pleasure: Explicitly Teaching The Writing Processes

This week’s #WritingRocks was about explicitly teaching the writing processes to children with a view to them creating and then using their own personalised process independently. This is because research has, for a long time, advocated for such an approach when teaching apprentice writers:

Chart

  • The first thing to state is that Writing For Pleasure teachers are likely to know that there isn’t really a single agreed upon writing process.
  • With this said, Writing For Pleasure teachers will also know that many children are unaware of typical processes involved in writing and they may not, at first, be able to control all aspects of the writing process at once. As a result, Writing For Pleasure teachers will likely teach children how to prioritise writing processes. This strategy can be modelled and involves showing children that when producing a piece of writing not all writing processes have to applied at the same time and in fact this can be too demanding (Locke, 2015, p.162)! Instead focus on one process at a time. For example, when drafting, children can focus on the composition of their manuscript and proof-read and edit it at another time.

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“All Children Can Write”: A Tribute To Donald Graves

Donald Graves: 1930 – 2010

The following article by Donald Graves (written in 1985), considered by many to be the “father” of the process approach to writing, is a classic piece on the need for a change in the way writing has typically been taught in schools. This article helped spark the movement now known as ‘The Writer’s Workshop’ or ‘Process Writing’ approach and has influenced our modern interpretation called ‘Real-World Literacy‘.

This article is excellent because Graves discusses the challenges and needs of students, clearly lays out how teachers can establish a community of writers and the writing process, and provides examples of teachers and students working together.

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